Category Archives: In the News

Children with Cerebral Palsy May Require More Pain Management, Study Says

Via: Cerebral Palsy News Today

By: Patricia Inacio

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often have pain that is overlooked by therapists and caregivers, a new study found. This pain frequently has articular (joints) and orthopedic origins, and can be linked to scoliosis and therapies for spasticity, among other causes.

The report, “Prevalence of pain in 240 non-ambulatory children with severe cerebral palsy,” was published in the journal Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.

Assessing the level of pain in children with CP is important because it occurs frequently and can be aggravated by care. Previous studies have reported the varying frequency of pain in children with CP, but comparing the results of these studies is difficult, the authors stated.

Researchers set out to “estimate the prevalence of pain among a homogeneous population of young and non-ambulatory children with CP and to identify the factors associated with a high risk of pain.”

The team analyzed data from an ongoing clinical trial (NCT01840930) with non-ambulatory children with CP, ages 3 to 10. Researchers determined if pain was present by directly posing two questions to the child and the child’s family, as long as the patient could communicate and understand the questions.

“We also asked whether the child was given analgesics occasionally, which represented a way to better detect the criterion ‘presence of pain,’” researchers wrote.

The level of pain was assessed via a visual analog scale for children able to communicate and with the Douleur Enfant San Salvadour (DESS) scale, a specific measurement for non-communicating children.

In total, 240 children were included in the analysis (107 girls and 133 boys).

Overall, 65 children experienced pain for an estimated pain prevalence of 27.1%. The pain in all of these children was orthopedic in origin. Twenty-six children (45.6%) also experienced pain of another origin.

Regarding pain care, 47.4% of the children were occasionally given analgesics.

“The most frequent pain sites were the hips (43.4%) and the feet (26.9%). The circumstances of pain were joint mobilization in 35/60 children (58.3%). The sitting position was mentioned as painful for 6/58 children (10.3%),” the researchers wrote.

Moreover, the team found that pain increased with scoliosis (43.1% versus 24.1%, with and without pain, respectively) and spasticity treatment (32.3% versus 17.2%, respectively). Scoliosis is a term that describes an abnormal, side-to-side curvature of the spine. Spasticity is a condition in which certain muscles are continuously contracted.

The study suggests that children with CP are often burdened with pain, particularly articular and orthopedic pain. This is often overlooked by caregivers.

“We point to the importance of systematically evaluating pain in these children, especially by therapists and caregivers, as a recommendation or at least as questioning. The treatment of pain should begin as soon as possible, to prevent not only the excentration of hips but also deformation of feet and scoliosis,” the team concluded.

Google Wants Help Tagging Accessible Places

Via: Disability Scoop

By: Shaun Heasley
Google is looking to the public in an effort to make navigating the world easier for people with disabilities.

The search giant is asking users to add information about wheelchair accessibility to entries on Google Maps.

“Because anyone can identify and label wheelchair-friendly locations directly on the map, it’s easy to share this knowledge around the world. But not everyone knows this tool exists, so we want to do more,” wrote Sasha Blair-Goldensohn — a software engineer for Google Maps who uses a wheelchair — in a post this month about the new push. “We’re calling on Local Guides, a community of people who contribute their expertise about places on Google Maps, to add more wheelchair accessibility attributes to the map.”

Google Maps was updated last year to include details on wheelchair accessibility alongside basics like hours, addresses and telephone numbers of businesses and other locations. However, many entries still lack such information.

Google relies on users to submit details about accessibility and has created a one-page guide to help individuals assess locations they visit. To contribute information, users answer five simple questions in a process that Blair-Goldensohn said takes just seconds to complete.

A series of meetups for Local Guides this month in cities around the globe is designed to add accessibility details to a flurry of new Google Maps entries.

“And wheelchair users aren’t the only ones who will benefit,” Blair-Goldensohn noted. “You’ll also be making life easier for families with strollers, seniors with walkers or anyone making plans with a friend who has impaired mobility.”

Cerebral Palsy Blogger Nominated at Women of Influence Awards

Via: Stuff.co.nz

By: Matthew Cattin

With an IV line sticking out of one arm, Grace Stratton used the other to type her first blog post from a hospital bed.

It was November 2015, and she was about to undergo her sixteenth surgery in as many years.

Now 17, the Warkworth resident’s writing has taken off, and has seen her nominated for the Young Leader category of this year’s Women of Influence Awards.

Born with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy, Grace noticed at a young age that she stood out.

“My entire life – because I’m disabled – everything I did, people paid more attention to it,” she said.

“Even just simple things like making my own cups of tea or being independent, people took more notice. As I got older and became an adult, I realize that gave me power.”

Grace used the power of her platform to her advantage, and took up blogging.

Utilising her website, Facebook page and Instagram, Grace produces regular content for her followers, and for herself.

“I haven’t just been hooked on it because I enjoy it – I’ve been hooked on it because of necessity as well. It’s something that I need to do for my own sanity,” she said.

“The real world is quite difficult for me to navigate around. I find it hard to get from place to place.

“There’s very little that I can do without difficulty, but the internet and computer is one thing that I am able to do without problems.”

Grace says she gets her mindset from her family, and finds inspiration in disability advocates Robbie Francis and Jess Quinn.

She also admires the work of social media influencers Logan Dodds and Jesse James Cassrels whom Grace accompanied on a jet ski adventure in April.

“I admire the way they chased dreams and hustled without apology, and they’re always there to help,” she said.

Grace says the best influence empowers people to have the confidence to make a change.

“It’s not just about influencing a community – it’s about influencing people to know that the responsibility is on them. They have the power to make changes in their situation.”

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Children with Cerebral Palsy May Require More Pain Management, Study Says

Via: Cerebral Palsy News Today By: Patricia Inacio Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often have pain that is overlooked by therapists and caregivers, a new study found. This pain frequently…

Read more

Google Wants Help Tagging Accessible Places

Via: Disability Scoop By: Shaun Heasley Google is looking to the public in an effort to make navigating the world easier for people with disabilities. The search giant is asking…

Read more