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By Boaz Joseph

Brenden Parker has accomplished a lot recently.

Last year, he graduated from Clayton Heights Secondary at the age of 17.

He’s now working on a big fundraising effort for a B.C. charity.

Not bad for a teen who can’t walk, dress or feed himself.

Parker, who has advanced Cerebral Palsy (CP) and must rely on an electric wheelchair and the close support of his family, is giving back to Easter Seals Camp Squamish, a place that’s made his summers.

For the last seven years, Parker has gone to Easter Seals Camp Squamish for one week each summer to have fun and meet other kids – and the occasional councillor – with CP.

Thirty-three-acre Camp Squamish, located at the foot of Mount Garibaldi and the mouth of the Squamish River, provides five six-day sessions throughout the summer for hundreds of kids with various physical and mental disabilities.

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By Josh Layton

An athlete has become the first person with cerebral palsy to complete an Ironman contest after crossing the line with his twin.

Peder Mondrup, who has used a wheelchair his entire life, completed the punishing race to rousing cheers after nearly 16 hours.

Peder and brother Steen are also the first twins where one has cerebral palsy to complete an iron man event together.

Steen pulled his sibling in an inflatable rubber boat for the 3.8km swim before carrying him to a double bicycle that included a built-in lightweight running wheelchair for Peder in front.

After completing the 180.25km circuit Steen pushed Peder ahead of him in a lightweight running wheelchair for the final 42.2km marathon stage in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Steen said: “It means everything. It’s been a dream for five years and now it has come true.”

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By Janine Nel

For most of us, everyday activities like tying our shoelaces, getting dressed or brushing our hair is second nature. But for children with cerebral palsy, being able to do these simple tasks is just magic!

Now occupational therapists and magicians from Breathe Arts Health Research aim to make rehabilitation fun for them, with literally a few tricks up their sleeves.

Children with cerebral palsy (also known as hemiplegia) usually have paralysis on one side of their bodies, and have difficulty with day-to-day tasks.

Traditional therapy exercises can help. But many children find these boring, which can slow down their progress.

Put a wand in that child’s hand, however, and it’s a different matter.

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