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By Brittany Valencic

Sayers Grooms loves to run. She loves to race and to feel the wind rush through her short strawberry blond hair. She loves the way it makes her feel: free.

Except, running is a lot harder when your legs don’t work properly. Sayers is 9 years old and has ataxic cerebral palsy. Despite her challenges, Sayers participates in RaceRunning, a Danish sport for people with mobility disabilities and impaired balance.

Competitors use custom-built bikes that resemble a hybrid between a bicycle and a wheelchair, which gives runners the correct support and allows them to move at relatively high speeds.

“She is a committed and focused athlete who is trapped in an uncooperative body,” said Mary Grooms, Sayers’ mother. “I wanted to find a sport outlet for my daughter, and it turns out RaceRunning was the perfect answer.”

Read the full story here.

 

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By Steve Edelson

In some ways, very little has changed since I first met Frank Kineavy, then 15, on the baseball field at Manasquan High School.

He still knows no limits in spite of the physical limitations placed on him by cerebral palsy, and exudes a confidence and exuberance many able-bodied young men could never imagine even though communicating the simplest thought is a laborious exercise.

But as I saw him Tuesday in the Rutgers Athletic Center, a lot has changed, even since I saw him last a few years ago at Villanova, where he was one of the managers for the men’s basketball team.

Back then everyone knew him as he zipped around campus in his wheelchair, already the star of an award-winning, student-made documentary titled “Coming Off the DL,” which highlighted Kineavy and Nick Gaynor, a fellow student with cerebral palsy who served a manager for the women’s basketball team.

Now, in the offices of the sports information department, where Kineavy is a writer for Scarletknights.com, he’s entering the next stage of what is nothing short of an extraordinary life. He’s got two writing gigs right now, including one with Diversity Inc., and gets more done in a day than pretty much anyone I know.

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By Hannah Delacourt

Marie Holmes of Shallotte, N.C. is about $88 million richer after claiming her Powerball prize Monday in Raleigh. Her $188 million winning ticket was sold Feb. 11 at a local Scotchman convenience store. After consulting with her attorney, Holmes opted for the $127 million lump sum payment, for an after-tax winning of $87.9 million.

At a press conference Monday afternoon at the North Carolina Education Lottery headquarters, Holmes, a single mother of four, said she is grateful for the opportunities the win has created for her family.

“This is gonna make a huge difference for them,” she said speaking about her children. “They are going to live a comfortable life without struggling. Anything my kids ask for, I can get it for them.”

Until recently, Holmes said she supported her family by working jobs at Wal-Mart, Food Lion, KFC, McDonald’s and Subway. While Holmes said she has not fully processed the win just yet, she said the jackpot will not change her as a person. She said with the money she wants to finish her college degree in nursing and hopes to travel, having never been outside the United States.

Holmes also plans to tithe at church and charitable organizations for cerebral palsy, a disorder her 7-year-old son has.

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