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For 16th Birthday, a Teen’s Special Request for Birthday Cards

By Susan Elzey

There are lots of things Tambra Malone can’t do. She can’t make her son, Tate, well from his cerebral palsy and seizures.

She can’t turn back the clock to almost four years ago to when, waking up in the middle of the night, she heard a strange sound from her husband, Timothy, and found blood on his face.

Some medical event then — the doctors still don’t understand —changed him from the vibrant man he was, shouldering much of the care of Tate, to one who needs care himself.

But Tambra can cling to her faith, keep her attitude positive and try to fulfill Tate’s wishes for his upcoming 16th birthday.

“People stare at him when we are out in public and judge him by his condition. They think he can’t do anything,” she said. “But he communicates by eye gestures and some words like ‘stop’ and ‘look.’”

When she gave him a choice of how he wanted to celebrate his birthday, he asked for three things: music, to be on the Ellen DeGeneres show and to have birthday cards.

Tambra is making plans for the music, isn’t promising the TV show and is hoping that by getting Tate’s request for birthday cards out to the public, he will get a generous supply of those for his special day.

Want to send a card?

If you would like to send a birthday card to Tate, you may mail it to Tate Malone at 233 Meadowbrook Drive, Danville, VA 24540.

Read the full story.

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