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Operation in America Could Help Cheltenham Toddler Isla Haffield, Who has Cerebral Palsy, Walk for the First Time

By Michael Yong

A specialist operation in the United States could help toddler Isla Haffield walk for the first time. Two-year-old Isla was born two months premature, and suffered bleeding in the brain just hours after birth. It left her with brain damage, which months later, developed into cerebral palsy. The little girl, who has to do physiotherapy exercises five times a day, finds it difficult to use her arms, but more importantly, her stiff legs.

While most children her age will be running around the playground, Isla struggles to stand. The cerebral palsy means she cannot sit without her specialist seat, and is unable to crawl or stand unaided. Her parents, Jason and Kate, from Badgeworth, Cheltenham, were heartbroken when they learned the news about their only child.

Kate said: “It was really worrying when we heard about it the morning after the birth. I had seen very little of her, because it was a difficult birth. But when I heard about the bleeding in the brain, it was like a dagger through my heart. My first thought was ‘is she going to live?’

Read the full story here.

 

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