Posts in 'Medical Research'

University of Texas Health Sciences Seeking Patients for Cord Blood Studies

In the News, Medical Research

By Cord Blood Registry, Inc. The purpose of this study is to compare the safety and effectiveness of two types of stem cells,(either banked cord blood or bone marrow), in children between the ages of 2 to 10 years with CP. 15 children with banked cord blood at CBR and 15 children without banked cord... Read More

Pediatric Stroke Clinical Trial

In the News, Medical Research, Stories

By The Cord Blood Registry Stroke occurs when blood flow is interrupted to part of the brain, leading to the destruction of brain cells. The risk of a stroke in children is greatest in the first year of life, and peaks during the perinatal period, roughly the weeks before and immediately after birth. Now, families... Read More

Atlanta Boy Participates in Clinical Trial for Cerebral Palsy Cure

In the News, Medical Research

By Everett Catts A Buckhead boy with cerebral palsy is among the first group of children to participate in America’s first clinical trial using each patient’s hip bone marrow stem cells. Cerebral palsy is a neuromuscular disorder caused mostly by injury or abnormal development in the brain, mostly before birth. John Drambel, who turns 10... Read More

Undergrads, Professors Collaborate to Develop State-of-the-Art Leg Brace for Student with Cerebral Palsy

Assistive Technology, In the News, Medical Research

Robotic exoskeletons have long been a staple of science fiction. Now, Master of Information student Thomas Garside has collaborated with iSchool Professor Matt Ratto and a team of Engineering students and motion specialists from the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education to make such a device a reality. A full-time student concentrating on critical information... Read More

Cerebral Palsy Breakthrough Gives Infants New Hope

In the News, Medical Research

By Niladri Bose Melbourne researchers have found a breakthrough for cerebral palsy. They can now stop, and even reverse brain damage by pumping cord blood back into the newborns, who are often starved of oxygen. Low oxygen levels during childbirth can cause severe brain injuries. Researchers at the Monash Medical Centre feel that with this,... Read More

How Do I Find Out About Clinical Trials in My Area?

In the News, Medical Research, Updates

In a previous blog, we covered what clinical trials are, the 4 FDA-mandated phases of a trial, the benefits and risks of participating, what current clinical trials relate to cerebral palsy and what might be involved in qualifying for one. The next step is learning how to find clinical trials in your area. Read More

Clinical Trials and Cerebral Palsy: The Basics

In the News, Medical Research, Updates

As with most medical conditions, cerebral palsy does not have just one treatment. Considered “incurable,” the condition of cerebral palsy results in a lifelong quest for improvements, not cures. Read More

Broccoli Sprouts May Prevent Cerebral Palsy, Research Suggests

In the News, Medical Research

The answer to preventing one of the main causes of cerebral palsy may be as simple as eating broccoli sprouts during pregnancy. Read More

Mechanisms That Allow Embryonic Stem Cells to Become Any Cell in the Human Body Identified

In the News, Medical Research

New research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem sheds light on pluripotency -- the ability of embryonic stem cells to renew themselves indefinitely and to differentiate into all types of mature cells. Solving this problem, which is a major challenge in modern biology, could expedite the use of embryonic stem cells in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Read More

Diabetes Drug Makes Brain Cells Grow

In the News, Medical Research

The widely used diabetes drug metformin comes with a rather unexpected and alluring side effect: it encourages the growth of new neurons in the brain. The study reported in the July 6th issue of Cell Stem Cell, a Cell Press publication, also finds that those neural effects of the drug also make mice smarter. Read More